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Finance Watch is committed to transparency, independence and good governance. The governance structure – described in detail in our Articles of Association (see above) has been designed with these values in mind and allows for a clear separation of responsibilities.

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The General Assembly is Finance Watch’s” highest governance body. Both types of Member (Member Organisations and Individual Members) are entitled to attend and vote via separate voting colleges. The votes of each college are weighted so that votes from Member organisations together represent 60% of the total vote, and votes from individual Members together represent 40% (apart from for Board elections – see below). The General Assembly meets at least once a year to debate and approve Finance Watch’s key action priorities, to approve the budget and accounts, elect the Board of Directors, and approve the membership of the Committee of Transparency and Independence (CTI). vote via separate voting colleges. The votes of each college are weighted so that votes from Member organisations together represent 60% of the total vote, and votes from individual Members together represent 40% (apart from for Board elections – see below). The General Assembly meets at least once a year to debate and approve Finance Watch’s key action priorities, to approve the budget and accounts, elect the Board of Directors, and approve the membership of the Committee of Transparency and Independence (CTI).

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  • The first priority for legislators and supervisory authorities should be to ensure that banks’ loan origination, credit risk management and NPL management processes are adequately reported, regulated and properly supervised:
    • In the interest of providing better transparency and as an ‘early warning.
    • Mechanism’ to flag any build-up of NPLs in specific segments of the economy.
    • Would also propose the inclusion of more granular reporting:
      • In the interest of providing better transparency and as an ‘early warning.
      • Mechanism’ to flag any build-up of NPLs in specific segments of the economy.
      • Would also propose the inclusion of more granular reporting.
  • Banks that lack the financial resources to cope with their NPLs without having recourse to public funds should be restructured or resolved under the Bank Recovery and Resolution Directive (BRRD). Existing loopholes, such as the “precautionary recapitalisation” should be closed and the European Commission’s State Aid rules (the “2013 Banking Communication”) properly aligned with the BRRD as a matter of urgency.
  • A well-functioning, transparent and professional secondary market for NPLs could be an important part of the solution provided it does not undermine credit standards or lead to aggressive and inappropriate enforcement actions. Harmonised rules for NPL investors and credit servicers should be conducive to this effort.

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The General Assembly is Finance Watch’s highest governance body. Both types of Member (Member Organisations and Individual Members) are entitled to attend and vote via separate voting colleges. The votes of each.

vote via separate voting colleges. The votes of each college are weighted so that votes from Member organisations together represent 60% of the total vote, and votes from individual Members together represent 40% (apart from for Board elections – see below). The General Assembly meets at least once a year to debate and approve Finance Watch’s key action priorities, to approve the budget and accounts, elect the Board of Directors, and approve the membership of the.

Replace the phrase ‘non performing’ with ‘sub prime’ and we are back to the fatal and discredited game of ‘pass the parcel’ that was at the root of the last financial markets cataclysm

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The General Assembly is Finance Watch’s highest governance body. Both types of Member (Member Organisations and Individual Members) are entitled to attend and vote via separate voting colleges. The votes of each college are weighted so that votes from Member organisations together represent 60% of the total vote, and votes from individual Members together represent 40% (apart from for Board elections – see below). The General Assembly meets at least once a year to debate and approve Finance Watch’s key action priorities, to approve the budget and accounts, elect the Board of Directors, and approve the membership of the Committee of Transparency and Independence (CTI). vote via separate voting colleges. The votes of each college are weighted so that votes from Member organisations together represent 60% of the total vote, and votes from individual Members together represent 40%

(apart from for Board elections – see below). The General Assembly meets at least .

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The General Assembly is Finance Watch’s highest governance body. Both types of Member (Member Organisations and Individual Members) are entitled to attend and vote via separate voting colleges. The votes of each.*

The General Assembly is Finance Watch’s* highest governance body. Both types of Member (Member Organisations

and Individual Members) are entitled to attend and vote via separate voting colleges. The votes of each college are weighted so that votes from Member organisations together represent 60% of the total vote, and votes from individual Members together represent 40% (apart from for Board elections – see below). The General Assembly meets at least once a year to debate and approve Finance Watch’s key action priorities, to approve the budget and accounts, elect the Board of Directors, and approve the membership of the Committee of Transparency and Independence (CTI).

vote via separate voting colleges. The votes of each college are weighted so that votes from Member organisations together represent 60% of the total vote.

link page call to action


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The General Assembly is Finance Watch’s highest governance body. Both types of Member (Member Organisations and Individual Members) are entitled to attend and vote via separate voting colleges. The votes of each college are weighted so that votes from Member organisations together represent 60% of the total vote, and votes from individual Members together represent 40% (apart from for Board elections – see below). The General Assembly meets at least once a year to debate and approve Finance Watch’s key action* priorities, to approve the budget and accounts, elect the Board of Directors, and approve the membership of the Committee of Transparency and Independence (CTI)*. vote via separate voting colleges. The votes of each college are weighted so that votes from Member organisations together represent 60% of the total vote, and votes from individual Members together represent 40% (apart from for Board elections – see below). The General Assembly meets at least once a year to debate and approve Finance Watch’s key action priorities, to approve the budget and accounts, elect the Board of Directors, and approve the membership of the Committee of Transparency and Independence (CTI).

The General Assembly is Finance Watch’s highest governance body. Both types of Member (Member Organisations and Individual Members) are entitled to attend and vote via separate voting colleges. The votes of each.

The General Assembly1 is Finance Watch’s highest governance body. Both types of Member (Member Organisations and Individual Members) are entitled to attend and vote via separate voting colleges. The votes of each college are weighted so that votes from Member organisations together represent 60% of the total vote, and votes from individual Members together represent 40% (apart from for Board elections – see below). The General Assembly meets at least once a year to debate and approve Finance Watch’s key action priorities2, to approve the budget and accounts, elect the


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De VSV en de Vlaamse overheid behandelen uw persoonsgegevens volgens de bepalingen van de wet van 8 december 1992 tot bescherming van de persoonlijke levenssfeer ten opzichte van de verwerking van de persoons- gegevens.

Types of memberships

 Full MemberAssociate Member
Voting RightsYesNo
Fee / year1,000 €100 € (waived 1st year)
ConditionsNo link with financial institutionsNo link with financial institutions
Governance rightsYesNo

Note :

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The General Assembly is Finance Watch’s highest governance body. Both types of Member (Member Organisations and Individual Members) are entitled to attend and vote via separate voting colleges. The votes of each college are weighted so that votes from Member organisations together represent 60% of the total vote, and votes from individual Members together represent 40% (apart from for Board elections – see below). The General Assembly meets at least once a year to debate and approve Finance Watch’s key action priorities, Committee of Transparency and Independence (CTI).

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The General Assembly is Finance Watch’s highest governance body. Both types of Member (Member Organisations and Individual Members) are entitled to attend and vote via separate voting colleges. The votes of each college are weighted so that votes from Member organisations together represent 60% of the total vote, and votes from individual Members together represent 40% (apart from for Board elections – see below). The General Assembly meets at least once a year to debate and approve Finance Watch’s key action priorities, Committee of Transparency and Independence (CTI).

List name 03

The General Assembly is Finance Watch’s highest governance body. Both types of Member (Member Organisations and Individual Members) are entitled to attend and vote via separate voting colleges. The votes of each college are weighted so that votes from Member organisations together represent 60% of the total vote, and votes from individual Members together represent 40% (apart from for Board elections – see below). The General Assembly meets at least once a year to debate and approve Finance Watch’s key action priorities, Committee of Transparency and Independence (CTI).

List name 04

The General Assembly is Finance Watch’s highest governance body. Both types of Member (Member Organisations and Individual Members) are entitled to attend and vote via separate voting colleges. The votes of each college are weighted so that votes from Member organisations together represent 60% of the total vote, and votes from individual Members together represent 40% (apart from for Board elections – see below). The General Assembly meets at least once a year to debate and approve Finance Watch’s key action priorities, Committee of Transparency and Independence (CTI).

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link page call to action

[1] « Emmanuel Macron veut un contrôle politique des ratios bancaires prudentiels », l’Agefi du 19 avril 2018. Voir également la vidéo de son intervention au ‘Lancement des consultations citoyennes sur l’Europe à Epinal’ à partir de de 23’34’’ : https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x6hztba

[2] « Macron veut que les règles de fonds propres soient fixées au niveau politique », Les Echos du 7 mars 2017.

[3] Capital Requirements Regulation, Article 501 of Regulation (EU) No 575/2013.

[4] Voir Élisabeth Kremp, & Claude Piot, « Le ralentissement du crédit bancaire aux PME en France », Revue d’économie financière, 2014/2, N° 114.

[5] Par exemple l’étude de Gambacorta et Shin, « Why bank capital matters for monetary policy ?», BIS Working Paper No 558, avril 2016.

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